Get to know London

Buckingham Palace

 Buckingham Palace

  • Buckingham House, as it was first called was built by the 1st Duke of Buckingham between 1702 and 1705 and bought by George III in 1762. It is two places, not one.
  • It is a family house where children play and grow up. It is also the place where presidents, kings and politicians go to meet the Queen.
  • Buckingham Palace is like a small town with a police station, two post offices, a hospital, a bar, two sports clubs, a disco, a cinema and a swimming pool. There are 600 rooms and three miles of red carpet. Two men work full-time to look after the 300 clocks. About 700 people work in the Palace.
  • One of the most interesting sights is the Changing of the Guard. There are always guardsmen and policeman too outside the Palace. Every day a new guard of thirty guardsmen marches to the palace and takes the place of the old guard. This is one of the most popular sights for tourists in London. First the band marches through the gates of the Palace. The job of the police is to stop the tourists from following the guards. Then the rest of the new guard marches through the gates. The Guardsmen wear traditional uniform: a red coat and a black helmet. The helmet is called a ‘Bearskin’ and it’s made of fur.

London Eye

London Eye

  • London Eye (commonly known as the London Eye, or Millennium Wheel) is an extremely large passenger-carrying observation wheel in Central London in England.
  • The London Eye is located at the western end of Jubilee Gardens, on the South Bank of the River Thames in the London Borough of Lambeth in England, between Westminster Bridge and Hungerford Bridge. The site is nest to that of the former Dome of Discovery, which was built for the Festival of Britain in 1951.
  • It is the largest observation wheel in Europe, and has become the most popular paid tourist attraction in England, visited by over three million people in one year.
  • At the time it was erected, in 1999, it was the tallest observation wheel in the world, until it was surpassed by the Star of Nachang (160 metres) in May 2006 and then the Singapore Flyer (165 metres) on 11 February 2008
  • However, it is still described by its operators as “the world’s tallest observation wheel”.
  • The entire structure is supported by an A-frame on one side only.

 

Hyde Park

Hyde Park

  • One of several royal parks in London, situated within 390 acres (about 159 ha)
  • Divided into two parts by the Serpentine Lake. Hyde Park was founded in 1536 by Henry VIII, who acquired these lands from the monks of Westminster Abbey
  • Most of the architectural objects in the park were designated in the 19th century by Decimus Burton. Since then, the park became a popular place for social gatherings and cultural events.
  • This was the original gate of Buckingham Palace, built in 1827.Turned out to be too narrow for the royal carriage and moved it into the current location in 1851.
  • The place to which the name of Hyde Park owes its ordinary meaning – as a forum for the free expression of all views in the name of freedom of speech – is Speakers’ Corner, located near Marble Arch. This is the traditional place of speeches and debates (such as speaking there Karl Marx and Vladimir Lenin), taking place especially on Sunday mornings.

 

Tate Modern

Tate Modern

  • Tate Modern is a British National Museum of the International Modern Play in London
  • The museum is located at the southern bank of Thames in Southwark, in the immediate vicinity of the Globe Theatre and the Millennium Bridge
  • The building of the gallery constituted the main hall of the Bankside Power Station of the project of Gilbert Scott which was built in two stages in years 1947-1963
  • As the museum, the building was opened on 12 May 2000.
  • From the beginning of the being, Tate of Modernisms is regarded as one of the most interesting museums in the world presenting modern art (by Museum of Art Modernisms in New York).

I. Sz.